statedept:

U.S. National Security Advisor Susan E. Rice previews the first-ever U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit where President Obama will welcome nearly 50 African heads of state to Washington, as well as leaders from across Africa’s civil society, private sector and faith communities.

Texas State Senator Leticia Van De Putte & Myself. Soon to be Texas Lt. Governor. It was an honor meeting her tonight. #TexasPolitics #TexasDemocrats #Houston #Texas #LeticiaVanDePutte #HarrisCountyDems #Politics #KamauMandela (at Harris County Democratic Party)

While I’m in Texas, I got a chance to listen to & meet Senator Leticia Van De Putte, who is running for Lt. Governor. She is absolutely amazing!

A evening of Golf with these guys! Hanging with some Young Giants-Future Legends-Leaders tonight! It’s always a good thing to be in the presence of Greatness! Watch out for these guys! #Millennials #Greatness #TopGolf #Golf #Houston #GoodTimes #Houston #AristocratLiving #KamauMandela (at TopGolf Houston)

msnbc:

arimelber:

Talking to Senators Rand Paul and Cory Booker before our interview about their juvenile justice bill.
Interview: http://www.msnbc.com/the-cycle/watch/sen-paul-and-booker-in-first-live-interview-313662019613


 #Bipartisanship msnbc:

arimelber:

Talking to Senators Rand Paul and Cory Booker before our interview about their juvenile justice bill.
Interview: http://www.msnbc.com/the-cycle/watch/sen-paul-and-booker-in-first-live-interview-313662019613


 #Bipartisanship msnbc:

arimelber:

Talking to Senators Rand Paul and Cory Booker before our interview about their juvenile justice bill.
Interview: http://www.msnbc.com/the-cycle/watch/sen-paul-and-booker-in-first-live-interview-313662019613


 #Bipartisanship

msnbc:

arimelber:

Talking to Senators Rand Paul and Cory Booker before our interview about their juvenile justice bill.

Interview: http://www.msnbc.com/the-cycle/watch/sen-paul-and-booker-in-first-live-interview-313662019613

 #Bipartisanship

dianaross:

Diana on the cover of Jet Magazine, 1978

(via blackfashion)

whitehouse:

President Obama’s got some advice for Republicans in Congress: Help expand opportunity for more Americans. whitehouse:

President Obama’s got some advice for Republicans in Congress: Help expand opportunity for more Americans. whitehouse:

President Obama’s got some advice for Republicans in Congress: Help expand opportunity for more Americans.

whitehouse:

President Obama’s got some advice for Republicans in Congress: Help expand opportunity for more Americans.

msnbc:

Mississippi’s last abortion clinic won a major victory at the conservative 5th Circuit of Appeals, which said a law intended to make the state “abortion-free” and close the clinic was unconstitutional.

ourpresidents:

LBJ Signs the Medicare Bill On This Day in 1965
When President Lyndon B. Johnson signed Medicare into law at the Harry S. Truman Library on July 30, 1965, he told the nation that it had “all started with the man from Independence.” 
Harry S. Truman, LBJ said, had “planted the seeds of compassion and duty” that led to the enactment of Medicare, a national health insurance for the aged through an expanded Social Security system.
Truman was the first President to publicly endorse a national health insurance program. As a Senator, Truman had become alarmed at the number of draftees who had failed their induction physicals during World War II. For Truman these rejections meant that the average citizen could not afford visiting a doctor to maintain health. He stated:

“that is all wrong in my book. I am trying to fix it so the people in the middle-income bracket can live as long as the very rich and the very poor.”

Truman’s first proposal in 1945 provided for physician and hospital insurance for working-aged Americans and their families. A federal health board was to administer the program with the government retaining the right to fix fees for service, and doctors could choose whether or not to participate. This proposal was defeated after, among many factors, the American Medical Association labeled the president’s plan “socialized medicine” taking advantage of the public’s concern over communism in Russia.
Even though he was never able to create a national health care program, Truman was able to draw attention to the country’s health needs, have funds legislated to construct hospitals, expand medical aid to the needy, and provide for expanded medical research.
In honor of his continued advocacy for national health insurance, Johnson presented Truman and his wife Bess with Medicare cards number one and two in 1966.
-from the Truman Library ourpresidents:

LBJ Signs the Medicare Bill On This Day in 1965
When President Lyndon B. Johnson signed Medicare into law at the Harry S. Truman Library on July 30, 1965, he told the nation that it had “all started with the man from Independence.” 
Harry S. Truman, LBJ said, had “planted the seeds of compassion and duty” that led to the enactment of Medicare, a national health insurance for the aged through an expanded Social Security system.
Truman was the first President to publicly endorse a national health insurance program. As a Senator, Truman had become alarmed at the number of draftees who had failed their induction physicals during World War II. For Truman these rejections meant that the average citizen could not afford visiting a doctor to maintain health. He stated:

“that is all wrong in my book. I am trying to fix it so the people in the middle-income bracket can live as long as the very rich and the very poor.”

Truman’s first proposal in 1945 provided for physician and hospital insurance for working-aged Americans and their families. A federal health board was to administer the program with the government retaining the right to fix fees for service, and doctors could choose whether or not to participate. This proposal was defeated after, among many factors, the American Medical Association labeled the president’s plan “socialized medicine” taking advantage of the public’s concern over communism in Russia.
Even though he was never able to create a national health care program, Truman was able to draw attention to the country’s health needs, have funds legislated to construct hospitals, expand medical aid to the needy, and provide for expanded medical research.
In honor of his continued advocacy for national health insurance, Johnson presented Truman and his wife Bess with Medicare cards number one and two in 1966.
-from the Truman Library

ourpresidents:

LBJ Signs the Medicare Bill On This Day in 1965

When President Lyndon B. Johnson signed Medicare into law at the Harry S. Truman Library on July 30, 1965, he told the nation that it had “all started with the man from Independence.”

Harry S. Truman, LBJ said, had “planted the seeds of compassion and duty” that led to the enactment of Medicare, a national health insurance for the aged through an expanded Social Security system.

Truman was the first President to publicly endorse a national health insurance program. As a Senator, Truman had become alarmed at the number of draftees who had failed their induction physicals during World War II. For Truman these rejections meant that the average citizen could not afford visiting a doctor to maintain health. He stated:

“that is all wrong in my book. I am trying to fix it so the people in the middle-income bracket can live as long as the very rich and the very poor.”

Truman’s first proposal in 1945 provided for physician and hospital insurance for working-aged Americans and their families. A federal health board was to administer the program with the government retaining the right to fix fees for service, and doctors could choose whether or not to participate. This proposal was defeated after, among many factors, the American Medical Association labeled the president’s plan “socialized medicine” taking advantage of the public’s concern over communism in Russia.

Even though he was never able to create a national health care program, Truman was able to draw attention to the country’s health needs, have funds legislated to construct hospitals, expand medical aid to the needy, and provide for expanded medical research.

In honor of his continued advocacy for national health insurance, Johnson presented Truman and his wife Bess with Medicare cards number one and two in 1966.

-from the Truman Library